Note: As of January 1, 2008, the Active Living Network is no longer operational. To stay connected to the active living movement, visit RWJF's related national programs: http://www.rwjf.org/programareas/npolist.jsp?pid=1138.
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Complete streets triumph >>

"Streets as places" seminar Nov. 29-30 in New York City >>

Healthy Eating/Active Living collaboration in New Hampshire >>

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Resource Types: Toolkit

The San Francisco Bay Area’s Transportation and Land Use Coalition created this report as a resource for low-income communities and communities of color for getting involved with transportation ...

The National Recreation and Parks Association "Step into Action" guide provides recommendations for improving the livability of communities. Intended for park and recreation planners, the ...

Pedal Pioneers: A Guide to Bicycle Travel with Kids is designed to help teachers, youth group leaders, and passionate individuals organize their own group youth tours for kids who can bicycle indep ...

The IOM’s 2005 action plan to address childhood obesity represents one of the most important pieces of supporting information for advocates and professionals working to promote Active Living. Thi ...

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This one-page fact sheet explains methods and strategies for implementing change in urban planning and development.

The reference toolkit provides bicycling information, from a list of instructors to safety advice.

This website features a resource directory of helpful organizations, useful links and tools to assist with advocating and implementing Safe Routes to Schools.

A research toolkit showing how changes in a physical environment can promote active lifestyles.

Part of the Active Living Network's communication toolkit, this useful fact sheet explain methods and strategies for implementing change in public health policy.

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